Topic: The handbook of Islamic ethics philosophy article

Description

“Islamic ethics for refugees: a Palestinian Case Study.

The article will address the question of the Islamic ethics for refugees. First there will be a primary data that will present the history of the Islamic ethics toward refugees who came from Mecca to Habasha and then from Mecca to Madina. Some more primary research from Islamic studies scholars will be presented as well.

The main focus will be the treatment of refugees by a host community, and also the ethics of refugees in treating each other and in treating the host community.

There will be as well a section that will focus only on refugee women and the special ethical treatment toward them in Islam.
it has to be 8100 words.

Handbook of Islamic Ethics (BHIE) Instructions for Authors

“Islamic ethics for refugees: a Palestinian Case Study. With a focus on Palestinian refugee women.

The article will address the question of the Islamic ethics for refugees. First there will be a primary data that will present the history of the Islamic ethics toward refugees who came from Mecca to Habasha and then from Mecca to Madina. Some more primary research from Islamic studies scholars will be presented as well.

The main focus will be the treatment of refugees by a host community, and also the ethics of refugees in treating each other and in treating the host community. There will be as well a section that will focus only on refugee women and the special ethical treatment toward them in Islam.

Readership. BHIE serves academic scholars, students, seminarians and also the general public. It is aimed not only to serve specialists in Islamic Ethics, but also studies in comparative ethics. The editor agrees with the late Fazlurahman that ethics is the foundation of jurisprudence. Thus, the volume also serves critical studies in Islamic laws and jurisprudence. Because its vast array of title choices encompasses classical and modern as well as theoretical and applied ethics, BHIE is useful in all institutions that deal with ethical questions in day-to-day matters of life. This is an important aspect of the volume that all contributors may keep in mind in their authorship. They need to exhibit scholarly rigor, but their work should also be accessible to readers who may not have extensive knowledge of Islam. Accordingly, handbook contributors are encouraged to provide glosses (literal translations) where necessary, dates of death as appropriate, briefly identify phrases for figures mentioned within an article and brief explanatory phrases to define field-specific concepts as necessary. Please also keep in mind that you are asked to write a handbook chapter, not a journal article, nor an encyclopedia entry. BHIE articles should primarily provide an overview of a subject matter. Thus, these articles should not be based on arguments, analytical criticism and timedependent phrasing, such as “recent, lately, etc.”

Each article should be accompanied by a substantive, standalone summary of no more than 100 words. Article summaries should appear at the top of each article. Please begin both the summary and the article itself with a topic sentence that identifies the subject in the first few words. D. Key words. Please provide a list of keywords that will allow a reader searching for related topics to easily locate your article. Spelling variants for terms that appear in the article or other relevant terms that may not appear in the article at all can be useful. E. Transliteration. Please note that the conventions adopted for BHIE. For Arabic, instead of dj, we use simply j; instead of ḳ, we use q. Please see the transliteration tables adopted from EI3 in the Appendix for more specifics. We strongly prefer that articles be submitted using the Gentium font. Submissions in fonts that we cannot read will be returned to the author for reformatting. F. Cross-references. Please do not include “q.v.” within your article to signal a crossreference, as these will be taken care of with hyperlinks. Instead, we ask that you provide, in the case of a person, the date of death or other identifying information, or for other names, a brief identifying phrase as appropriate, e.g., “Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī (672/1274)”. G. Word counts. The word count assigned for your articles is optimally 8000 words with the possibility of 20% increase if you feel it is absolutely needed. 4 II. BHIE Style A. Qurʾān citations. All citations of verses from the Qurʾān should follow the “standard” Egyptian edition and appear in the form “Q 3:23” (or “3:23” when Q has already appeared in the sentence). The Q is written without italics and without a period. B. Ḥadīth citations. These should be given as book and bāb, not page number or number of the ḥadīth, as these can vary. Please also provide, in the bibliography, the publication details of the edition you use. C. Spelling. Contributions should be submitted in English (with occasional exceptions to be dealt with on an ad hoc basis) with British spelling, using the Oxford English dictionary as authority. Please note that we are using the -is- termination rather than -iz- (organisation, civilisation, etc.), and other British spellings, such as defence (n.), practise (v.), etc. For Arabic titles, and names, please retain the “al-”: al-Isfahānī, etc. For transliteration of book or article titles observe the following notes: (kitāb-l fī (كلا يف بات قلاخلأاو) wa-l-akhlāq) مولعلل) lil-‘ulūm) (taklīf-l-bi (ب لا فیلكت نبا و ب&ت) ibn and bint written as b. and bt.) ھبتك م) maktaba) with no h at the end D. Dates. For pre-modern figures and events (up to about the 19th century), please use the format Hijri/Common, e.g., 421/1030 and 421-3/1030-3. Both Hijri and C.E. dates should be given for most pre-modern figures (an exception would be a mediaeval European figure or event, which would probably require only C.E. dates). C.E. dates are sufficient for most modern figures: Abū ʿAli Aḥmad b. Moḥammad Miskawayh (d. 421/1030). But Muḥammad ‘Abdullāh Drāz (1958-1994). For pre-Islamic dates, C.E. or B.C.E. should be used (with no spaces between letters). For the 19th and 20th centuries, omission of Hijri dates is acceptable, depending upon the context. E. Numbers. Numbers from one to twelve not belonging to a series of figures should be spelt out, and later numbers may be spelt out or written as numerals, depending on context. In dates and page references, the smallest possible number of figures should be used, e.g., 223-4 (not 223-224), 1960- 1 (not 1960-61), but 1396-1402. F. Weights and measures. All measures (length, area, volume, capacity, weight) should be given in metric units, with the word “metre” or “kilometre” written out, not abbreviated. Temperatures should be given in Celsius. G. Bibliography. Organisation of article bibliographies will, to some extent, be dictated by the article itself, with alphabetical order by author’s last name being the most common format. For longer bibliographies, you may wish to list primary sources first, under the heading “Sources,” followed by the secondary sources, under the heading “Studies.” In some cases, it may make sense to include a section on editions or works by the subject of the entry. Please note that authors’ names for bibliographic entries should be given in full, to the extent that they are provided on the title page of the work, with no inversion of given name and family name. In general, bibliographies should not be longer than 20% of the length of the article itself. Bibliographies for longer articles may be divided into paragraphs and some annotation is acceptable, as necessary. H. Citation Style. For citations and bibliographical notes, we generally use the Chicago Manual of Style with preference of in-text citations and endnotes where necessary rather than footnotes. For in-text citations, in cases where the full reference is given in the bibliography, please use the following format: “(Fakhri, 247)”, that is, author’s last name and page number. If there is more than one work by the same author in the article bibliography, then please give the author’s name, a shortened version of the title, and the page number: for an article, “(Chittick, Friendship and Love, 79)”; for a book, “(Fakhri, Ethical Theories, 126- 7).” Book titles in Arabic are italicised. Only the first word of the title is capitalised, along with proper nouns (and in English, proper adjectives). Subtitles follow the title after a period (unless the title ends in a question mark or exclamation point). Please provide the city and the year of publication at the end. Here are examples: a-Sharīf al-Murtaḍā (Rasā’il). Rasā’il al-Sharīf al-Murtaḍā. Introd. Aḥmad al-Ḥusaynī. Ed. Mahdī Rajā’ī. 4 vols. Qum: Dār al-Qur’ān al-karīm, 1405[/1984-5]. Jalāl, ‘ Abd al-Fatḥ. Min uṣūl al-tarbīya fī l-Islam (of the sources of education in Islam). Sars alliyan (Sierra Leone): Maṭba‘ at al-markaz al-dūwalī lil-ta‘ līm al-waẓīfī lil-kibār fī l-‘ālam alarabi, 1977. Burns, P. J. “The myth of adat”. Journal of Legal Pluralism, 28 (1989): 1-127. Salle, K. Kebijakan Lingkungan Menurut Pasang: Sebuah Kajian Hukum Lingkungan Adat pada Masyarakat Ammatoa Kecamatan Kajang Kabupaten Daerah Tingkat II Bulukumba. Ph.D. Didd., Makassar, Indonesia: Universitas Hasanuddin, 1999. “Islamic Declaration on Global Climate Change.” International Islamic Climate Change Symposium. 2015. http://islamicclimatedeclaration.org/islamic-declaration-on-globalclimate-change/ (Last Accessed: 10 September, 2016). Annotation, as necessary, within the bibliography is permissible, but contributors are asked to keep bibliographies as succinct as possible.

Type of service-Academic paper writing
Type of assignment-Article
Subject-Philosophy
Pages / words-26 / 7000
Number of sources-0
Academic level-Doctoral
Paper format-Chicago
Line spacing-Double
Language style-US English

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